Crime, News

Daniel Jack Kelsall found guilty of Morgan Huxley’s murder, indecent assault

A jury of seven women and five men today returned guilty verdicts to charges of indecent assault and murder.

They took a total of just two-and-a-half hours after retiring yesterday to reach their decision.

Morgan’s friend and ex-girlfriend Jessica Hall spoke immediately on behalf of the family, saying his life had been stolen by “a worthless psychopath.”

Morgan Huxley, pictured with ex-girlfriend Jessica Hall, was murdered in September 2013.

Morgan Huxley, pictured with ex-girlfriend Jessica Hall, was murdered in September 2013.

Daniel Jack Kelsal, who decided to follow a barefoot Morgan Huxley after seeing him in the same shop on Military Road, leaves NSW Supreme court after being found guilty of murdering Morgan Huxley. Picture: Craig Greenhill

Daniel Jack Kelsal, who decided to follow a barefoot Morgan Huxley after seeing him in the same shop on Military Road, leaves NSW Supreme court after being found guilty of murdering Morgan Huxley. Picture: Craig Greenhill

Jessica Hall, Huxley’s ex-girlfriend, speaks to the media after the verdict. Picture: John Grainger

Jessica Hall, Huxley’s ex-girlfriend, speaks to the media after the verdict. Picture: John Grainger

Ms Hall said Morgan had been deprived of getting married and one day playing with his children.

Kelsall will be sentenced on April 29.

The verdict came after Kelsall, 21, a cleaner, himself gave evidence on Monday of a consensual sexual encounter with Mr Huxley, claiming it was interrupted by a “person” coming into the bedroom to attack them both.

The version was at odds with the story Kelsall, who worked as a kitchen hand at the Sydney Cooking School, told police during an interview in September 2013.

Mr Huxley was stabbed more than 20 times in his bedroom, his blood-covered body discovered by his flatmate Jean Redmond after the vicious attack.

The jury heard on the opening day of evidence that Kelsall told two doctors in 2012 that he’d had “intrusive, recurring and persistent thoughts” of stabbing someone with a knife on the way home from work.

Kelsall told psychiatrist Matthew Boulton that his victim would “probably be a total random” but later said he had “absolutely” no wish to kill anyone.

Dr Susan Allman told the jury that Kelsall told her he had even gone so far as to take a knife home from a night shift one night but “hadn’t met anybody” on his way home.

The Wellington native, who moved to Sydney to join his family in late 2010, got confused in retelling these consultations to the jury, stammering as he tried to explain they were only “imagined thoughts” and not something he ever intended to do.

Kelsall’s father Mark told the jury his son had become “dopey” and “not the Jack of old” after being placed on heavy doses of the anti-psychotic drug Seroquel.

Crown Prosecutor Peter McGrath SC asked the jury to consider “how plausible” it was that Kelsall “had all this bad luck” to meet and have a sexual encounter with Mr Huxley on the very night he was murdered.

“It just happens to be someone who’d experienced intrusive, recurring and persistent thoughts about attacking someone with a knife on the way home from work, a total stranger, some random,” Mr McGrath said.

“Morgan Huxley was not so lucky on the night of September 8, 2013. It was not the accused who was in the wrong place at the wrong time, it was Morgan Huxley who was unfortunately placed in the wrong place at the wrong time when this man, the accused, went after him.”

The jury heard Kelsall’s DNA was found on the businessman’s penis, and a bloodied fingerprint was found on Mr Huxley’s door.

Damning to Kelsall’s case was that Mr Huxley’s blood was found on the shoulder bag he was seen carrying on the CCTV as he moves quickly in the same direction as his victim.

Morgan Huxley was unfortunately placed in the wrong place at the wrong time when this man, the accused, went after him
Prosecutor Peter McGrath

Kelsall told the jury he had cleaned the “red stains” off his bag the day after Mr Huxley died after seeing a media report about the killing.

He said he wanted to “disassociate” himself from what had happened and was “very, very scared” for his own safety.

Mr McGrath suggested to Kelsall, a keen chess player, that the murder investigation and trial were “a game”. HERALDSUN

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